Exam access arrangments for deaf teens (part 1)

When Hayley is denied extra time in her maths exam, a baffled Tiger mother embarks on a battle to ensure Hayley is given the Exam Access Arrangements she needs.

I’m sitting here fuming. I can’t believe how rubbish Hayley’s school Special Needs Coordinator (Senco) is.

As the new term gets underway, once again it dawns on me, the deja vu feeling of ‘oh god here we go again’ as familiar as the scuttle of crisp yellow autumn leaves along pavements and the long nights drawing in.

School. And with it the deflating inevitability of the battles ahead.

There are several to be had, but the biggest one has been trying to find out what special arrangements Hayley should have for exams and tests.

I recalled learning from NDCS that deaf students can have extra time, a reader where necessary and a quiet room. I foolishly assumed this would automatically be put in place.

“When Hayley asked about her extra time the Senco replied that she wasn’t entitled to it”

But then one day at the end of summer term, Hayley came home upset. They’d had a maths test and she hadn’t finished the paper. At the end, the Senco had taken some pupils off for extra time, but when Hayley asked about her extra time the Senco replied that she wasn’t entitled to it.

I was baffled but took it as a reminder to find out exactly what she should be allowed.

“Some deaf children are entitled to 25% extra time in exams”

I called NDCS helpline and they emailed me information on Exam Access Arrangements, including the fact that some deaf children are entitled to 25% extra time in exams. The information suggested asking either Hayley’s Senco or Sensory Support about her case.

Because the Senco has been ineffectual up until now, I decided to contact Sensory Support. They said they’d pass the message onto Hayley’s Teacher of the Deaf (ToD).

That same afternoon, I received a belligerent email from the Senco, stating that she was “puzzled that you were querying why I “refused” Hayley any access arrangements for the recent exams.”

She continued by telling me that “Hayley’s literacy skills are excellent and so she clearly does not need to have any help with these or her writing.”

For one, that was irrelevant – these skills were tested three years ago and ToD assessments since then have shown Hayley’s levels have dropped, as the lessons and language have become more advanced.

I responded, asking whether she’d considered Hayley’s deafness and her specific learning difficulties.

I said I didn’t recall mention of Hayley’s processing speed being tested – I’d read in the NDCS information that some deaf students need longer to process what they read and were allowed up to 25% extra time. The same went for pupils with specific learning difficulties, such as poor working memory – which the Senco had made no mention of, but which it is documented that Hayley has.

Then I got a call from Hayley’s ToD. She was very helpful, and asked me to leave it with her. She added that it would be preferable if I didn’t mention to the Senco that I’d spoken to her – it wouldn’t go down well as her duty was to report to the school, not the parent, and we wanted to get the best outcome.

Days later, Hayley told me the Senco tested her processing speed, then informed her that the results showed her processing was slow, and she’d therefore be allowed extra time in exams.

Hooray I think? I couldn’t be certain unless the Senco confirmed it, but I received nothing from her.

The summer came and went. Back at school I’ve emailed asking for an update. It turns out the Senco has left, and even though I’d copied in the new Senco, I got no response.

I re-sent the email exchange and finally I’ve received an email from the new Senco, saying that the ToD has provided a report that recommends specific access arrangements for examinations and tests for Hayley. “These include additional time and the provision of a quiet room. We have now added Hayley to the school’s Access Arrangements list to ensure she receives this entitlement from now on.”

Hallelujah!!

So we’re a little further forward, thanks to NDCS, as ever, Hayley’s ability to speak up for herself and my stubbornness. Hayley now has a better chance to get good grades in her GCSEs.

But the point is, if we hadn’t spoken up, she’d not have had as good a chance of success.

“Deaf children underachieve in GCSEs”

And what makes me mad is that Hayley’s not going to be the only one – deaf children already underachieve in GCSEs, with 63% of deaf children failing to get 5 A* to C GCSE grades including English and Maths.

The lesson once again is that your deaf child won’t get what support they need without fighting for it.

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